Kentucky: How Artists get involved in saving hemlock trees

The Save Kentucky Hemlock occasion began with a group art show, with original paintings, reduction prints, wood block prints, stained glass, sculptures, from a diverse group of artists. Some of the artists are attempting to incorporate hemlock wood into their art pieces. Many Moons Design of Lexington donated hemlock siding from salvaged old barns Forester Merill Flanary takes hemlock seriously. Flanary is co-founder of Save Kentucky’s Hemlocks, a grassroots partnership of citizens, non-profits and government agencies working together to save eastern hemlocks in an effort to combat the newly established non-native insect, Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, which is expected to kill ninety percent of Kentucky’s eastern hemlocks, also known as Tsuga, in the next few years.

Get full text; Support da’ word producer:
http://kimmyville.blogspot.com/2009/03/save-kentuckys-hemlocks.html

All tree news about Kentucky:
http://forestpolicyresearch.com/category/north-american-tree-news/kentucky/

The Tsuga is a beautiful fir tree called “hemlock” due to the
similarity in its smell to the leaves of the historical and infamously
poisonous plant. Flanary is eager to spread the word that these
magnificent conifers are a much more integral part of Kentucky’s
eco-system than one might think.

In the spirit of community awareness and in celebration of eastern hemlocks, she and fellow forester Greg Abernathy organized the Tsuga Art & Music Event last December, sponsored by Save Kentucky’s Hemlocks.

Flanary explains, “Kentucky’s hemlocks are healthy, unlike vast stands of dead hemlocks in neighboring states. She advises that if we act now, Kentucky can preserve a significant portion of its hemlocks from mortality.

“Not only are they a significant part of our ecosystem, eastern hemlocks
are a favorite tree among so many because of their majestic beauty and
cultural importance. The loss of the eastern hemlock will be felt for
generations, much like the loss of the American Chestnut in the early
1900s.”

Range of Eastern Hemlock
For more information about the eastern hemlock and its impact on our
ecosystem , contact:
Merril Flanary
Kentucky Natural Lands Trust
Forest Steward
859-948-0031
http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=mflanary@knlt.org
P.O. Box 506
Harlan, KY 40831

Website: http://kyhemlocks.org/
http://kimmyville.blogspot.com/2009/03/save-kentuckys-hemlocks.html

Comments (2)

elizabeth napierMay 15th, 2009 at 5:19 am

i hate to see this pertty tree die like this,it has all ways been the one i like the best,I am from harlan co ky,they are dieing out and it hurt me so much to see this…

Elizabeth ProngasAugust 7th, 2009 at 5:05 am

We need you! The Catoctin Forest Alliance – Just beginning a major project here in the Catoctin Mountains of Maryland.

I am an Artist on the CFA Board and would like to know more about the program.

Will be in touch later as I have just found your website but have to deal with the schedule for today. Elizabeth

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