Nepal: Water sources in Dadeldhura district are drying up due to deforestation

Water sources in Dadeldhura district are drying up at an alarming rate due to increasing deforestation and climate change. Nearly 60 percent of the water sources in the district have run dry within the past 19 years, according to a recent study. Rajendra Mishra, one of the experts involved in the study, said that since the early ’90s, there has been a drastic change in the rain cycle.

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“We’re not receiving adequate rainfall and due to deforestation and
other human activities here, the earth has lost its water storage
capacity,” he said.

Looking at the current rate of deforestation, Mishra says, “Even rivers will start drying up within a few decades.” Many drinking water projects in Dadeldhura have been severely affected, as the water sources here are running dry very fast. Some 28 percent population of the district still does not have access to drinking water.

According to Dal Bahadur Shahi, an engineer at Drinking Water Division Office, the drinking water projects are becoming ever costly everyday with the water sources getting scarce. The problem is not only of drinking water.

Natural disasters such as floods and landslides have also increased here, as the earth has lost its capacity to store water due to increasing deforestation. “The devastating floods in Kanchanpur and Kailali districts last year were triggered by the deforestation at Chure Parbat jungle,” said Shahi.

“Though many nations are battling the effects of global warming considering it as a burning issue which needs immediate attention, our government has not yet taken any step to tackle the climate change,” Mishara further said. “The government must be aware of the looming crisis invited by the global climate change and act immediately.”

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