Congo: Gov decides to ramp up genocide & exploitation of indigenous peoples territory

“Congolese government authorities are … signaling their intent to
backtrack on decisions and expand industrial logging activities in the
DRC,” a statement from Global Witness, Greenpeace and Rainforest
Foundation said.

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“Such a move would … demonstrate a disregard for the rights of local
communities, undermine efforts to reduce deforestation and degradation
and thwart opportunities for the DRC to benefit from climate-related
payments.” Countries such as the DR Congo may be able to benefit from
a UN forest programme aimed at fighting climate change.

The organisations urged international donors to work to prevent the
reversal of forest sector reforms. In January, Global Witness hailed
the Congolese government for cancelling a raft of logging contracts
but warned it needs to do more to ensure forest wealth benefits its
people. The organisation, which combats the corrupt exploitation of
natural resources, said that despite the decision to revoke the
contracts, the government’s control over the forestry sector remained
“extremely weak”.

It was responding to a January decision to cancel some 60 percent of all contracts with logging companies, and convert others into long term concessions which are subject to strict social and environmental rules. The decision followed a lengthy review of timber contracts aimed at stamping out corruption in the sector. DR Congo contains the world’s second largest forested area after the Amazon and exports 200,000 cubic metres of timber annually. But of the 49 million dollars (37 million euros) generated in foreign revenue, the government receives only 1.8 million in taxes and duties.

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http://www.climateark.org/shared/reader/welcome.aspx?linkid=120531

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