Guyana: A Better understanding of how deforestation will develop

McKinsey’s report, published last December, is titled, “Saving the
World’s Forests Today: Creating Incentives to Avoid Deforestation”. A
better title might have been “Hand over the money or we’ll destroy the
forests”. Armed with the report, President Jagdeo is currently in
Davos at the World Economic Forum. From there he will visit Norway’s
prime minister, Jens Stoltenberg, followed by a visit to Prince
Charles in England.

Click link for full text/increase funding for writer/producer of these
words: http://www.redd-monitor.org/2009/02/02/guyanas-president-jagdeo-launches-avoided-threatened-deforestation-scheme/

At the launching of the report, at the UNFCCC meeting in Poznan,
Jagdeo said that the great majority of Guyana’s forests are suitable
for extraction. The Kaieteur News reported Jagdeo as saying that
Guyana can earn between US$4.3 billion and US$23.4 billion “as the
country aggressively pursues economically rational land use
opportunities”. The article in Kaieteur News adds that Jagdeo said
that “economic pressures to increase value from forest resources in
Guyana are growing.” Writing in the forward to the McKinsey report,
Jagdeo states that this is “not in any way a threat, or a suggestion
that we will deliberately destroy our forest if the world does not pay
us.” But if it is not a threat, then what on earth is it?

Click link for full text/increase funding for writer/producer of these
words: http://www.redd-monitor.org/2009/02/02/guyanas-president-jagdeo-launches-avoided-threatened-deforestation-scheme/

Jagdeo’s problem with REDD is twofold. First, Guyana’s baseline
deforestation is low. Statistics produced by the UN Food and
Agriculture Organisation for Guyana indicate “no net loss of forest
cover between 1990 and 2005.” Second, he has to prove that any
reduction in deforestation is “additional” to business as usual.
McKinsey’s solution to Guyana’s low level of deforestation is to dream
up an ‘economically rational’ deforestation baseline. “[E]conomic
pressures to increase value from forest resources in Guyana are
growing,” explain McKinsey’s experts. “The great majority of Guyana’s
forests are suitable for timber extraction, there are large
sub-surface mineral deposits within the forest, and rising
agricultural commodity prices increase the potential returns to
alternative forms of land use, all increasing the opportunity cost of
leaving the forest alone. These challenges will intensify as
infrastructure links between Northern Brazil and Guyana advance,
increasing development opportunities in the interior of Guyana.”

McKinsey argues that Guyana could increase its deforestation rate to
4.3 per cent per year, destroying all forest outside protected areas
in 25 years. “Post-harvest uses such as commercial agriculture,
plantation forestry, ranching, and mining can generate attractive
ongoing cash flow after trees are cleared from the land,” states the
McKinsey report. “The value from post-harvest land use is typically
even greater than the value of the standing timber and will drive
deforestation even where forest resources are not themselves
commercially valuable.” It is on this basis that REDD payments should
be made, says McKinsey.

Click link for full text/increase funding for writer/producer of these
words: http://www.redd-monitor.org/2009/02/02/guyanas-president-jagdeo-launches-avoided-threatened-deforestation-scheme/

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Comments (1)

not goodMarch 31st, 2012 at 12:24 am

you should not ask for emails

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