Liberia: Prince of wales want to help ’em save their forests

The Prince of Wales is interested in working with countries around the
world, such as Liberia, which is seeking to make sure that its forest
regions are wisely use for the benefit of its people, and the nation.
Anna Creed, who is working with ‘The Prince Rainforest Project’, told
members of the Liberian delegation attending the UNFCCC summit taking
place in Poznan, Poland, during a meeting on Wednesday, that His Royal
Highness Charles, the Prince of Wales, is interested in initiating
dialogue with the Liberian forestry authorities on what can be done
for the country to help it reap benefits from its natural forest
regions.

Ms. Creed is part of the Prince Rainforest Project delegation
attending the Poznan summit. Speaking shortly after the meeting, the
head of the Liberian delegation at the ongoing Poznan summit, Mr. Ben
Donnie, said the Prince of Wales is interested in working with
countries around the world, such as Liberia, which is seeking to make
sure that its forest regions are wisely use for the benefit of its
people, and the nation. He said that as part of the aims and goals of
the Prince Rainforest Project, the delegation was informed that the
project would work with local community dwellers and seek their
economic advancement. The project and local dwellers can work together
in areas such as forest preservation, and put in place a proper and
prudent management system that would ensure natural resources are used
in the overall interests of a nation and its people. “As a clear
manifestation of the Prince’s desire to help us manage our forests,
the Liberian delegation has been invited to Wales next year, to meet
with the Prince and hold further discussions with the project
officials on the way forward in helping Liberia manage its forests,”
he said. Liberia is one of the West African countries that have
forests, which are very vulnerable to illegal trading in forest
produce, and the indiscriminate cutting down of trees for timber.
These illegal actions had become rampant during the course of the
country’s 14-year civil war crisis, with money generated from trade
landing in the pockets of the country’s political leaders, or a
privileged few, to the detriment of ordinary citizens.
http://theinquirer.com.lr/editorial_details.php?recordID=5735

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